Author

Joshua Feldman

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The same upper-level low that generated severe weather in the Plains and the Mid-South this week will bombard the Northeast US Friday afternoon and evening before dissipating over the weekend. A series of cold fronts will nudge hot, soupy air upward along the Atlantic Seaboard, sparking widespread thunderstorms. Several environmental factors will contribute toward some of these storms becoming severe, producing powerful wind gusts, large hail, and perhaps a tornado. Areas from New York City northward to Saratoga Springs and northeastward to Worcester, MA are most at risk for these storms. A warm front passed through the Northeast Friday morning, bringing wide swaths of downpours to Pennsylvania, New York, and northern New England.  Behind it, dew points surged into the mid 70s, humidity levels more suitable for the Caribbean than the Northeast. This first batch of rain is crucial, and may either hinder or enhance severe weather later in the day.…

The intrusion of upper-level low pressure systems into the continental United States from Alberta is always pesky business. Dubbed “clippers” in the winter, they’re notorious for transcontinental swaths of light to moderate snow. But their most vicious impacts generally arise in warm weather, when they can prompt the development of violent thunderstorms. Early Wednesday morning, an upper-level low crossed the border into Montana. Though it will have no special nomenclature as it does in the winter, this system (like many others this spring and summer) will leave a trail of scattered transcontinental thunderstorm damage as it races from the Central Plains Wednesday to the Northeast Friday. Nebraska and South Dakota will be the first to face the storms. As the upper-level shortwave crosses the Rocky Mountains Wednesday, stretching of the air beneath it will intensify the system both aloft and at the surface. A surface cyclone will drag the boundaries…

After two weeks of seemingly nonstop heavy rain for parts of the Mid-Atlantic, a break from the wet weather is finally in store. The Bermuda High will shift off shore as a parade of shortwaves weaken its western flank and push it southeastward enough to keep the plume of moisture away from the Mid-Atlantic and New England. Over the weekend it will expand across the Southeast, where the flow of moisture will continue but result in fewer storms given the presence of high pressure aloft. To say it has been wet would be an understatement. Parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York have received between 10 and 15 inches of rain over the last two weeks. Baltimore and Harrisburg both recorded their wettest July on record, with many other cities recording this July as a top five wettest month. The upcoming few days of dry weather has been long expected.…