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Scott Pecoriello

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After well above-average temperatures dominating the eastern US for much of September and the first half of October, things will cool down significantly after today’s cold front/Tropical Storm Michael duo. A very refreshing shot of cool air will seep down from Canada later today and tonight, dropping temperatures down into the upper 40’s inland and mid to lower 50’s closer to the coastline for daytime highs on Friday. This will set the stage for possible wintry weather on Saturday as a weak clipper system quickly moves through the region. Overnight temperatures on Friday and daytime highs on Saturday will be even colder as the brunt of the cold airmass overtakes the entire Northeast region. Highs will struggle to reach the middle 40’s across much of western Pennsylvania, New York, and New England, while even the coast will barely pass the 50 degree mark. The highest elevations will remain around freezing…

For the last several days we’ve been watching a disturbed area of convection south of the Yucatan Peninsula show small signs of tropical development. Over the last 24 to 36 hours though, we’ve seen this cluster of convention become a fairly well organized tropical storm, gaining the name “Michael” in the process and nearly reaching hurricane status this morning with winds hovering around 70 mph. Things have quickly become quite worrisome for Michael. What many thought would be a weak tropical system making landfall somewhere along the Gulf Coast now appears to have the potential to become a serious hurricane. Thus, rather than your normal 5 Thing to Watch This Week, we’ll be doing a special edition focused on Tropical Storm Michael and the significant impacts it may bring to Florida and the Gulf Coast later this week. Rapid Intensification Possible as Michael Nears Hurricane Status: Tropical Storm Michael will…

After multiple flash-flooding events this past summer, with the most recent just a few days ago, we turn to yet another heavy rain threat that will take place this afternoon through tomorrow morning. While we don’t expect totals quite as high as earlier in the week, we do anticipate several inches of rain to occur over the next 12-24 hours. The I-95 corridor looks to be the target of this event, with 1-3 inches of rainfall likely from the Washington DC area to New York City. Localized totals surpassing 3 inches are possible, especially towards the Appalachian mountains. The worst of the rain will come towards the end of our system, with the possibility of embedded thunderstorms that yield locally higher rainfall totals. This will be where flash flooding becomes a higher concern. Baltimore to southern CT will have to watch out for this between midnight and 4 or 5…