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Jackson Dill

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A new report released Monday by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) claims that accelerated sea level rise, mainly due to climate change, will worsen high tide flooding across the United States coastline. Within the next 30 years, which is the time frame of a typical mortgage, as many as 311,000 homes will be at risk for coastal flooding. This translates to a cost of about $117.5 billion in damages. According to UCS, “Roughly 14,000 coastal commercial properties assessed at a value of roughly $18.5 billion also are at risk during that time frame.” This situation will worsen further by the end of this century as sea levels continue to rise. Home and businesses worth $1 trillion will be at risk for water inundation. That would affect an estimated 2.5 million buildings. That is “roughly the equivalent of all the homes in Los Angeles and Houston combined—valued at approximately $912 billion…

The forecast has been rather uncertain so far with this rain event impacting parts of Texas and Louisiana. The ultimate driver of this rainstorm is an upper-level low situated over the eastern Rio Grande River Valley. Upper-level lows are often unpredictable and difficult to forecast, and this most recent event proves out point. The model guidance had a difficult time pinning down where the heaviest of rain will fall on Monday, suggesting that a long-lasting band of rain would impact Houston, but instead it struck the Beaumont-Port Arthur area. It ended up being the fourth wettest June day in Beaumont, Texas on record with a total of 5.89 inches of rain. This was the wettest day since 1959. Houston still received significant rainfall. Monday was the wettest day in the city since Hurricane Harvey, with 2.1 inches. This Tuesday, the radar picture is currently highlighting two areas of heavy rain, as…

A stationary front stalled from the Central Plains through the Mid-Atlantic midweek will be the main driver of much of the weather across the nation during this time period. This front often acts as a focal point, allowing for the development of heavy, flooding rains and severe thunderstorms. It will also acts as a separator between the warmer and cooler than normal air temperatures. Parts of the Northeast and Midwest experienced record heat on Monday. In Albany, the capital of New York, the day ended up being the fourth hottest day on record. Topping off at 97 degrees, this was the warmest temperature since July of 2012 and was just a few degrees from the all-time record high of 100 degrees in recorded history. This Tuesday, the northern Mid-Atlantic region, New England, Great Lakes, and Upper Midwest will all experience relief from the heat the remainder of the week. High…