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Jackson Dill

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It was a very ugly Saturday across parts of the Northeast, and unfortunately this weather will remain in the forecast through midweek as a cut-off low remains almost stagnant through Tuesday over the eastern Great Lakes. A cut-off low is basically a displaced area of the jet stream hovering in the mid level of the atmosphere. This will be the main culprit for the clouds, showers, and storms that are forecast over the next few days. The precipitation activity definitely won’t be as widespread today as it was yesterday, but large areas in the northeastern US will still be in for a rather ugly day. The worst of the weather will be in New England, as low clouds dominate much of the region through a large duration of the day. Temperatures will be in the 70s and 80s, both in New England and the Mid-Atlantic. The highest concentration of showers…

An incoming trough of low pressure located not too far off the Northwest coast on Friday will swing through the region this weekend, allowing for some welcome relief following a very toasty stretch of weather this week. There is a catch to this cool down, however. While the Northwest will be able to enjoy more comfortable weather, the northern Plains will deal with intense heat. This won’t last long, through, as another warm-up returns early next week. Following widespread, above-average temperatures on Friday, temperatures will take a nosedive on Saturday across the western two-thirds of Washington and Oregon. Highs will be up to 20 degrees below-normal, which means actual maximum temperatures will only be in the 60s and 70s. East of the Cascade Mountains, heat will continue to crank on Saturday with temperatures nearly 20 degrees above-average. This means high temperatures will range from the 70s and 80s in the…

Hurricane Hector, first forming on July 31 over the eastern Pacific Ocean, has entered the central Pacific Ocean this week. Crossing to the south of Hawaii on Wednesday, the storm is forecast to transition into a typhoon on Monday. Hector will begin to take a turn to the northwest this weekend. As it continues to track a westward direction as a hurricane, it will end up becoming a typhoon once it cross the International Date Line. While the eastern and central Pacific Oceans as well as the Atlantic Ocean have hurricanes, the western Pacific Ocean has typhoons and the Indian and South Pacific Oceans have cyclones. Likely staying as a hurricane or typhoon for nearly two weeks, Hector will be a long-lived, powerful storm but will reach the length of Hurricane John in 1994. John formed southwest of the Mexican coast on August 11 with a similar track to Hector,…