The WeatherOptics team examined all data, taking a look at the latest snow pack, future snowfall, and forecast temperatures to make our white Christmas outlook. We’ll continue to update the graphic below as Christmas gets closer.The best chance for a white Christmas this year is across the Norther Tier of the US as well as in the intermountain West. A white Christmas is also likely in the interior Northeast and throughout most of the Great Lakes region due to a deep snow pack that, for the most part, will stick around through at least December 25th. Remeber, a white Christmas is defined as having at least one inch of snow on the ground.

Now, where a white Christmas is possible is in the lower elevations of the Northwest and in portions of the Southwest, where snow has been off to a slow start this year. However, snow may finally return this week before the holiday, which is why these ares have been deemed as “Possible.” The same risk for a white Christmas also exists in the central Plains and into the Ohio Valley.

Just to the south of this category is the “Slight” risk. This means that a white Christmas is unlikely, but there is still the chance. This risk spans from the Texas Panhandle, through northern Oklahoma, and all the way to Southern New England. The forecast is especially tricky in the Northeast because the models continue to hint at a storm on or just before Christmas. It really depends on the storm track, as that will determine the placement of the warm and cold air. At this moment, though, it seems like the warm air will win the fight for the coastal sections of the Northeast, which includes the major I-95 corridor cities. However, keep your hopes up, because the forecast very well may still change. Merry Christmas!

Author

Jackson is Head of Content at WeatherOptics and produces several forecasts and manages all social media platforms. Previously, Jackson forecasted local weather for southwestern Connecticut, founding his website, Jackson's Weather, in the March of 2015. He is currently studying Meteorology and Broadcast Journalism as the University of Miami.

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