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Scott Pecoriello

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As one system moves out, the next one begins moving in—this time for the Midwest, interior Northeast, and New England. Overnight, a weak area of low pressure will drop south from Canada, spreading light snow into Minnesota and Wisconsin. This system will be very fast moving, and by time the sun rises tomorrow, light snow showers will have spread into much of Michigan and northern Illinois and Indiana (including Chicago). By tomorrow night, we expect the low to begin strengthening slightly, with light snow showers continuing across Michigan and slowly moving into Ohio, northwestern Pennsylvania, and western New York. It’s by early Tuesday morning, though, where the interest really begins to grow with our system. The low pressure will strengthen a bit more and snow showers will become not only heavier, but more expansive, spreading light to moderate totals across northern Pennsylvania, the entire western and northern-tier of New York,…

With an over-performing system in the south, and energy digging deeper across the Ohio Valley, it’s clear that our storm will come further west than originally anticipated, bringing higher totals to the major east coast cities and further inland. With new data and analysis, we’ve bumped up snowfall totals and shifted things slightly west yet again, reflecting the new information that we have. The worst of the storm will spread along and just to the east of the I-95 corridor from Richmond to Boston, bringing a swath of 4-7 inches, with localized areas seeing up to 8 inches. To the west of this swath, the cutoff will be pretty sharp, with totals rapidly dropping the further inland you go. Central Pennsylvania and central New York will be lucky to squeeze out flurries from this event. To the east of this swath, totals will also be lower, but due to mixing…

Last week we began discussing the possibility of a winter threat for both the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, but by early this week, the threat looked to have diminished with not a lot of energy interaction and a fast moving storm that would stay offshore. Well, things have changed. We discussed in an article earlier this week that if we had more interaction between our two upper-level jet-streams, there would be a chance for this system to move further northwest and bring snow to the I-95 corridor. This appears to be the exact case now. With more phasing, our low is adjusting closer to the coastline, greatly increasing the chance of accumulating snow from Richmond to Washington to New York City to Boston (not to mention further to the south as well). With confidence now increasing, we’ve gone ahead and released our first official call for the weekend storm, forecasting some areas…

Throughout the week we’ve discussed the first shot at widespread snow near the I-95 corridor. While guidance had backed off from that outcome over the last day or two, there appears to be a different trend today with our newest mesoscale modeling. An area of low pressure is currently developing over the Gulf of Mexico, drawing in very cold air from the north all the way down into the Gulf Coast region. So much cold air has been drawn in that snow is breaking out across southern Texas this afternoon, and will continue to spread into parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia tonight, tomorrow, and into early Saturday. Temperatures will be cold enough to even bring some light snowfall accumulations into these areas. Pretty unusual for early December. Later tomorrow this low pressure will begin to strengthen, gather more moisture, and head in a northerly direction, bringing rain and…

If you didn’t notice, our first launch last month didn’t go exactly as planned. We had a couple bugs, and we actually couldn’t handle all the traffic from the downloads right away (sort of a good problem to have). Not only that, but the app didn’t have all the features it needed to really follow through with our mission—helping you navigate your busy life without the weather interrupting your plans. The good news is that over the last month, we’ve made some real changes. These include corrections to the bugs that annoyed us just as much as you, an ability to handle far more traffic, and new features designed to help you “weather the storm” everyday. Here’s what you can expect with our new release (now live on the App Store), and why you should download it. The new app will have all the same standardized weather information as before. The…

There’s been chatter the last few days of a potential weekend snowstorm, and we’re here to break down the setup and try to put your questions to rest. The reason there has been a fair amount of hype over this Friday – Saturday – Sunday timeframe (December 8th, 9th and 10th) is because of the upper-level pattern at hand that we’ve been warning about for days now. The upper atmosphere screams for some type of big winter weather event to impact the eastern third of the US this weekend, but just as we see with every storm, it takes all players on the field working perfectly together in order to get something significant. This weekend we’ll have a rather large positive PNA (strong ridging out in the west), coupled with a very expansive east-based Positive EPO (massive ridging over Alaska and western Canada). The ridge is helping to pump a…

Earlier this month, our team at WeatherOptics rolled out a new website, new mobile app, and a large team of forecasters, tech savants, and entrepreneurs. We had a revised vision and direction, and a goal of making weather personalization possible nationwide, trying to disrupt what we saw as an older industry in need of innovation. Just like with any startup finding their footing, we had our fair share of issues. Launch wasn’t perfect, the app and website had some issues, and the merging of several companies into one was a difficult adjustment. The more imperative and obvious issue at hand with our “new company” however was beyond the tech and functionality, and was about what our audience (YOU!) was not satisfied with. And that was us steering away from our roots as a company. Sometimes you experiment with things as a team and they simply don’t work, no matter how…

Scattered rain and snow showers are impacting much of the northern Midwest today with cold temperatures and a storm quickly developing. As the morning and afternoon go on we’ll see an increase in precipitation from Des Moines to Chicago with pressure quickly lowering to the south over the center of the country. As we head into the overnight hours, a cool rain will overspread most of the region, but with our storm bombing out fast, snow is likely to develop on the northern fringe and backside, turning rain over to the white stuff from Des Moines to Milwaukee and up into parts of northern Michigan. It will be a very wet snow and rather quick hitting, so while light accumulations are possible, we don’t expect anything significant. Accompanying our rapidly developing storm system you can expect an increase in winds as well. They may be very gusty at times overnight…

With Turkey Day right around the corner, you might be wondering what you can expect in terms of weather for both travel and the actual holiday itself. If you’re traveling early in the week, the good news is that there won’t be much storminess around the country. The only area that we’re watching for possible issues is the Northwest where another powerful storm is expected to move through beginning on Sunday and lasting right through most of the week. In fact, it will really be the combination of two systems hitting back to back. Areas that have already been hit by these storms in past weeks can expect much of the same. High elevation heavy snowfall, lower elevation heavy rainfall, and gusty winds for everyone. It will not be ideal travel weather, that’s for sure. This system will make its way a bit more to the easy into parts of…

As we move towards the second half of November, the ingredients for snow will continue to improve with more cold air available and a pattern that will allow areas of low pressure to develop closer to the shoreline. Already this month we’ve seen several smaller systems drop light amounts of snow over the Northeast region, but so far nothing significant. Tomorrow a storm system will drop down from Canada and begin to develop across the northern Great Lakes, bringing rain showers from St. Louis to Chicago to Detroit. Colder air in the upper atmosphere following behind the system will catch up to the precipitation as the storm slows down around Montreal. Late tomorrow night and early on Thursday, guidance is showing enough energy transferring over to the coast to spark a weak second area of low pressure near southern New England. With cold air continuing to work its way into…