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Jackson Dill

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Over the past week and a half, heavy rains have dominated the weather pattern, from the Mid-Atlantic down through Florida. In the Mid-Atlantic region, heavy rain led to several washed-out roads in central Virginia following over half a foot of rainfall in just a matter of a few hours. This prompted schools in three different counties to close due to unsafe travel conditions. This heavy rain also led to a significant increase in the river water levels. As of Monday morning, seven river gauges are in flood stage, including the Potomac River at Edwards Ferry, Maryland, which is just northwest of Washington, DC. This gauge is measuring water levels at moderate flood stage. Even though its moderate, all that water still has to travel downstream, and the effects are being felt in our nation’s capital. The below video shows the scene at the Potomac River in Washington, DC. Credit: @johnthejewelerdc/Instagram Farther…

Through midweek, an area of low pressure will be tracking from the Great Lakes to the Northeast. This will bring rain and thunderstorms to the area, some of which may be severe. There’s also going to be a stream of moisture coming up from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, which may allow for heavier downpours. Thus, localized areas will experience flash flooding. This Monday, the steadiest and most widespread of the rain will be across the Great Lakes region. Rain and thunder will move from the western extent of the lakes to the eastern Great Lakes by the end of the day. Meanwhile, to the warmer southern sector of the storm, temperatures and humidity levels will be higher, so we’ll be watching for rain across the western Ohio Valley in the morning evolving to a line of thunderstorms as it tracks east in the afternoon and evening. It’s…

This Monday, we’ll be watching a cold front emerge from the southern Rocky Mountains. This will cause widespread showers and thunderstorms across eastern New Mexico and southeastern Colorado late in the day. Between 12 and 3pm MDT the storms will quickly develop and strengthen. There will also be a few storms possible in West Texas up through western Kansas. These storms will pose the main risk of damaging winds, some large hail, and even an isolated tornado or two. Overnight, these storms will march into West Texas, but will weaken early Tuesday morning. A few lingering showers will be possible after sunrise, but will dissipate midday.