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Jackson Dill

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National Weather Service offices issued a Flood Watch for six states, including portions of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and New Jersey as well as Washington, DC on Wednesday. This is due to the increased risk for flooding through this weekend as several rounds of heavy rain are forecast to move in. Thanks to a stationary boundary draped across the Mid-Atlantic paired with deep tropical moisture flowing in from the Caribbean Sea, this will keep storms nearly-stalled over the the region while allowing for heavier rainfall rates. On Thursday, much of the day will actually be dry in the Mid-Atlantic with occasional light rain showers passing through, especially in the morning. A few, widely scattered thunderstorms are then expected to develop in the afternoon, mainly south of the Mason-Dixon Line ahead of a large batch of moderate to heavy rain associated with a surface low  incoming from the southern Appalachian…

Following a nasty round of severe storms on Tuesday, the National Weather Service (NWS) went out with two teams from the Upton, NY office on Long Island to survey the damage and determine the significance of the reported tornado and whether any other tornadoes hit. There was also a team that explored the damage in the greater Binghamton, New York area for that respective office and one from the NWS in Albany. Here’s a brief summary of their findings: 9 tornadoes, 4 in New York, 4 in Connecticut, and 1 in Pennsylvania 1 EF-2 tornado, 6 EF-1 tornadoes, 1 EF-0 tornado, and 1 without a ranking 3 macrobursts 3 microbursts A tornado has been confirmed in Kent, New York of Putnam County to be an EF-2 tornado on the Enhanced Fujita scale. An EF-0 tornado is a low-end tornado with minimal damage while an EF-5 tornado, at the top of…

An unusual meteotsunami was recorded across portions of the New England and Mid-Atlantic coastlines Tuesday night following a strong line of thunderstorms that moved offshore from the northwest direction. According to the National Ocean Service of NOAA, “Meteotsunamis are large waves that scientists are just beginning to better understand. Unlike tsunamis triggered by seismic activity, meteotsunamis are driven by air-pressure disturbances often associated with fast-moving weather events, such as severe thunderstorms, squalls, and other storm fronts. The storm generates a wave that moves towards the shore, and is amplified by a shallow continental shelf and inlet, bay, or other coastal feature.” This meteotsunami was a weaker one with heights of generally up to one foot. With some of these events, heights can exceed six feet, however. Several tidal stations along the coast measured the change in water with fluctuating levels. At Woods Hole, Massachusetts, the water level chart looked like this:…