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Jackson Dill

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The second half of this work week will pose the greatest risk for flash flooding as the atmosphere becomes the most conducive to produce copious amounts of rain. Areas affected will be the Southeast up through the Mid-Atlantic and into parts of New England. Similar to last week’s set up, a large subtropical ridge of high pressure is located just off the East Coast of the United States, while an unusually large dip in the jet stream associated with an upper-level low pressure remains almost stationary over the interior East work. These two will work in conjunction with each other to funnel rich, tropical moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to the north. This funnel results in the constant flow of an ample amount of atmospheric moisture across the Eastern Seaboard, while surface features (such as low pressure and fronts) work to take that moisture and translate it into heavy…

July is coming to an end, and the average temperature, which accounts for both the temperatures during the day and night, in Death Valley has measured in at 108 degrees (Fahrenheit). There is still one day left of the month (July 31), so the average temperature may still change very slightly. Nevertheless, July 2018 in Death Valley is still on track to break the previous hottest month measured at any location in recorded history on Earth. The World Meteorological Organization will confirm this record after they review the data. Just last year, this record was broken at the same location. July 2017 averaged at a temperature of 107. 4 degrees, which broke the previous, century-old record (records date back to 1917) of 107.2 degrees from the July of 1917. This is a remarkable accomplishment for Death Valley, a city no stranger to the extreme heat. July is their hottest month…

The massive Carr Fire in Northern California, which ranks among one of the most destructive wildfires in state history, not only has burnt over 100-thousand acres of land, but has also recently spawned a powerful “firenado.” Similar to a tornado, this phenomena can also be known as a fire whirl. Credit: Skip Murphy These form when hot air from the fire rises, creating vertical columns, until it cools and becomes less dense as the air increases in altitude. As more air gets wrapped into this column, the suspended air begins to spin in a vortex. These “firenados” are just like dust devils but with added burning embers, ash, and malleable debris. This makes them very dangerous, as they act like a spinning tower of flames. An unusually strong “firenado” developed Friday on the northern side of Redding, California. According to radar rendering, the plume of smoke that spawned the vortex rapidly underwent…