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Jackson Dill

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Following a top five coldest April on record for much of the central US, the remainder of May will be hot and humid thanks to a dominant, upper-level ridge. A big northward surge in the jet stream will practically sit over the central US into the beginning of June. The jet stream often separates different air mass. South of the jet stream, or the strong winds at 30,000 feet, is where the hot air will be; north of it are the cooler temperatures. This upper-level ridge allows for warmer temperatures than normal. This Thursday, temperatures will be above normal coast-to-coast, but the warmest of air will be found in the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest. It’s these areas where highs may exceed levels of 20 degrees above average while the remainder of the Plains and Midwest are anywhere from near average in Texas to mainly 5 to 15 degrees above…

Another round of severe weather is ahead for much of the Plains and portions of the Upper Midwest this Thursday. An area of low pressure has continued to slowly track along the Canadian border. Attached to the south of that low pressure is a cold front, which separates two different air masses. This cold front will usher in a brief round of drier air as opposed to bringing in cooler temperatures. In fact, this particular cold front will actually allow for temperatures to warm up behind it. This cold front will be the main instigator. As it slowly tracks to the east, it will run into the warm, moist air and moderate to high instability. This interaction will spark a few batches of rain and thunderstorms across the Plains beginning in the mid-afternoon. Thunderstorms will not be widespread, and many areas are expected to remain dry into tonight. There are…

It’s been a rather wet May so far across much of the East, specifically the Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Florida. This heavy rain has lead to numerous reports of flooding and washed out roads. Florida has been hit the hardest in terms of rainfall amounts, but it’s all relative, as rainfall totals of over four inches is rarely ever seen farther north. In Florida, the onslaught of rain began late-week during the week of May 7th. Portions of the Sunshine State, which hasn’t been too sunny as of late, was in a moderate to severe drought. The next drought update will be released this Thursday, and it will likely show a further alleviation of the drought due to the persistence of heavy rain. Dozens of climate-recording locations in Florida have recorded a top five wettest May-to-date on record. This includes Miami, where they received 8.44 inches of rain so far, which…