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Jackson Dill

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A quieter week of weather is in store for the nation overall this week, but we still have several stories that we’re watching for you. This includes a widespread freeze and dominant chill, flood risks in Texas, unusual pattern in the Southwest, and a toasty Florida and Pacific Northwest. This is your 5 things to watch this week. Widespread Freeze: This morning, freeze alerts span from Washington to Ohio as millions deal with freezing or near-freezing conditions, marking an end to the growing season for 2018. This comes as a big trough of low pressure sweeps across western and central parts of the nation early week, resulting in low temperatures around the freezing mark for more than half of the US. Temperatures should relax by midweek with lows returning to the 30s (above freezing) and 40s across much of the region, while the Northeast experiences a substantial chill Thursday and…

Hurricane Michael made landfall as the 4th strongest tropical cyclone to ever make landfall on the US mainland in recorded history. According to the National Hurricane Center, Michael made contact with land near Mexico Beach, Florida with maximum sustained winds of 155 mph (just shy of a Category 5 storm) and a minimum central pressure of 919 mb (the 3rd lowest pressure for a hurricane making landfall in US).  After causing catastrophic damage near the landfall zone, Michael remains on the move, now as a tropical storm over the Carolinas. Gusty winds and flash flooding are the main risks, although an onshore flow along parts of the Carolinas and Mid-Atlantic coasts may produce some coastal flooding in the form of storm surge through late-week. A Storm Surge Watch is in effect from Ocracoke Inlet to Duck, North Carolina. Michael is now interacting with a cold front and a large trough of low pressure…

A rather locked-in jet stream pattern will keep the temperature pattern across the Lower 48 very similar over the next 1 to 2 weeks. An unusually deep trough over the western US, reaching the Baja California peninsula, is being triggered by a large ridge over Alaska. Downstream of that results in a ridge of high pressure over the eastern US, providing above average temperatures. In some of the highest of elevations of the northern mountains in the West, snow has been reported next week, but as a more substantial surface low pressure develops early-next week, a more widespread snow storm could be possible across the intermountain West and northern Plains thanks to the cold air in place. This Thursday, the nation will literally be divided by 2 different air masses. Across the interior Northwest, northern and central Plains, and upper Midwest, it will be quite chilly and definitely fall-like. High…