Thunderstorms have become almost a daily occurrence this week in the Northeast, and on Thursday night in New York City a lone thunderstorm moved through, producing a tornado after 10pm EDT.

The environment during this time period was quite unfavorable for a tornado due to the weak wind shear, but they are still possible.

Radar imagery from the time highlighted a tight couplet of rotation. This radar image below illustrates the bright red and green shades touching each other, showing a couplet and an area of rotation within the storm. The brighter colors indicate a strong rotation and a potential tornado at the time.

The National Weather Service at the office in Upton, New York on Long Island went out to survey the damage Friday morning and concluded that a tornado did in fact touch down, taking a 0.7 mile track from College Point to Malba in the Queens. Winds were estimated to have reached 85 mph, making it an EF-0 twister.

Most of the damage has been reported in Queens, with numerous power outages, downed trees, and branches. A resident of the College Point neighborhood told Chris Barca of the Queens Chronicle, “I know this isn’t Kansas but that was a twister.”

Below is a photo gallery of the damage from Queens, mainly from College Point.

Credit: Chris Barca/Queens Chronicle
Credit: Chris Barca/Queens Chronicle
Credit: Chris Barca/Queens Chronicle
Credit: Chris Barca/Queens Chronicle
Credit: Chris Barca/Queens Chronicle
Credit: Chris Barca/Queens Chronicle

Author

Jackson is Head of Content at WeatherOptics and produces several forecasts and manages all social media platforms. Previously, Jackson forecasted local weather for southwestern Connecticut, founding his website, Jackson's Weather, in the March of 2015. He is currently studying Meteorology and Broadcast Journalism as the University of Miami.

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