As a large shield of rain moves into the Southeast on Friday, cold air will be pushing into the northern half of that rain at the same time. This air will likely be cold enough for some snow! It is the deep South, however, any snow accumulations beyond a dusting are highly unlikely on the roads because all locations will be near to above the freezing temperature. On grassy surfaces, some locations may see up to two inches of snow, especially in southern Mississippi and central Alabama.

After the first shield of rain clears out Thursday evening, a second shield of rain from the Western Gulf Coast will move east to northeast into the Southeast U.S. That rain may adapt to snow during Friday morning from the Southern Appalachians Mountains, all the way down to the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. Some of that snow will continue all day long and into the evening, especially the further inland you are. I’m thinking there will be a thin, 50 mile wide line of moderate snow, spanning from the DelMarVa through south-central Virginia, western North Carolina, northern Georgia, central Alabama, southern Mississippi, and all the way down to southern portions of Louisiana through New Orleans. In areas where it will be less chilly with a wedge of warmer air sneaking in, there will be a mix just south of these areas mentioned.

Weatheroptics snow forecast for Friday

Then on Saturday, as a coastal storm begins to form off the Southeast coast, snow is possible on the outer edge of the precipitation shield. Areas where snow may be seen are: north-central South Carolina, central North Carolina, and southeastern Virginia. These are the areas where the snow accumulations are the most likely for Saturday, adding up to two inches. Thankfully, this will happen during the weekend.

Author

Jackson is Head of Content at WeatherOptics and produces several forecasts and manages all social media platforms. Previously, Jackson forecasted local weather for southwestern Connecticut, founding his website, Jackson's Weather, in the March of 2015. He is currently studying Meteorology and Broadcast Journalism as the University of Miami.

Comments are closed.