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Christmas is only less than two days away! We have a final graphic highlighting your chances for a white Christmas this year. Remember, a white Christmas is defined as having at least one inch of snow on the ground at 7AM on Christmas morning. That’s what our map shows below. Likely: The Northwest, intermountain West, portions of the Northern and Central Plains, Great Lakes, and interior Northeast are all likely going to have a white Christmas this year. A deep snowpack is already in place across the West and in much of the Great Lakes regions. A general swath of snow will move through the Central Plains and Ohio Valley Saturday into Sunday, which is perfect timing allowing you to have a white Christmas. Also a snowstorm is set to impact much of the Northeast on the night of Christmas Eve into Christmas Day itself. Therefore, snow is likely just…

Christmas is only a few days, and the forecast uncertainties on whether you will have a white Christmas this year are increasing. Below, you’ll find our potentially find our last white Christmas map, unless the forecast changes anymore.Snow is likely across the Intermountain West through much of the Northern Plains. Great Lakes and interior Northeast. There is snow cover currently on the ground and the upcoming intrusion of cold air will allow for most–if not all–of the snow to remain on the ground through at least Christmas Day. Now there are three areas in the U.S. where a white Christmas is possible. Another round of snow may move into southeastern Washington this weekend, but it won’t add up to much. In the Midwest from Omaha through Chicago, there is the slight chance for snow cover with a narrow swath to the south of where we think it is possible. Then…

Based on the most recent model data, we have updated our white Christmas forecast map based on the minor changes.The greatest chance for a white Christmas this year, which is when there is at least one inch of snow on the ground, is across the Intermountain West into the Northern Plains, Upper Midwest, and interior Northeast. There is currently a substantial snowpack for most of these areas, and it will likely stick around as a massive high pressure from the Arctic brings extreme cold to the Central U.S. and below average temperatures to the large majority of the country. Areas included in the ‘Possible’ risk for a white Christmas is in the Central Plains, portions of the Ohio Valley, and portions of the Northeast. There is a storm that will bring a light snow to much of the Central Plains Thursday into Friday, so it is possible all of this…

The WeatherOptics team examined all data, taking a look at the latest snow pack, future snowfall, and forecast temperatures to make our white Christmas outlook. We’ll continue to update the graphic below as Christmas gets closer.The best chance for a white Christmas this year is across the Norther Tier of the US as well as in the intermountain West. A white Christmas is also likely in the interior Northeast and throughout most of the Great Lakes region due to a deep snow pack that, for the most part, will stick around through at least December 25th. Remeber, a white Christmas is defined as having at least one inch of snow on the ground. Now, where a white Christmas is possible is in the lower elevations of the Northwest and in portions of the Southwest, where snow has been off to a slow start this year. However, snow may finally return…

We are now less than two weeks away from Christmas,  so you may be wondering if you will have a white Christmas. First of all, a white Christmas is defined as having at least one inch of snow on the ground on Christmas Day. Historically, the higher elevations and northern latitudes of the United States have the higher chances for snow on the ground on December 25th. Obviously, in the South, the chances are low for any given year. In the central Plains through the Ohio Valley and into the Mid-Atlantic, the chances are quite low as well, at between 10 and 40%. Of course every year is different, so let’s focus on the actual forecast for Christmas of 2017. This forecast may change, but based on the recent model guidance and analogs, a classic La Niña pattern is expected to set up around Christmas. That means there will be…

It’s been a cold start to the month of December, and all indications are for the cold to stick around through the end of this month. One of the main reasons for this chill across the East is because of what’s happening in the West, which is a positive PNA pattern, or Pacific/North American pattern. This type of pattern creates extreme ridging over the West. According to basic physics, what goes up must come down, so while a ridge sits over the West, a trough forms over the East. Based on the PNA forecast from the European model, it continues to show a positive PNA phase through mid-December, then it may actually turn negative for a brief time. That may sound like a complete pattern change but there other factors that play a role into the current pattern across the nation. Therefore, the general theme of a ridge over the…

We’ve complied a look into some of the top stories for this upcoming week. Check it out below. Clipper To Bring More Snow Another clipper system will drop a brief batch of snow Monday into Tuesday from the Upper Midwest to the Northeast. Accumulations will be mainly light, but will add more snow to the accumulations already on the ground from Saturday’s snowstorm in New England. We’ll have a full story on this clipper released later this Sunday. Brief Blast of Cold Another shot of cold air, originating all the way from the Arctic, will drop temperatures as much as twenty-five degrees below average through the midweek for the Great Lakes and Northeast regions. We’ll have a full story on this cool down released later this Monday. Ridge Dominates the West A ridge of high pressure will continue to sit over the West, keeping the region warm and dry throughout…

The dry and windy weather early this week has led to the development of severe major wildfires in Southern California. The Thomas Fire just outside of Los Angeles, the largest active fire in the US, has grown nearly 31,000 acres in 9 hours. A new fire also formed early Wednesday morning, and lead to scenes like this along the 405 Freeway: The wildfires can also be scene on satellite imagery. This image from NOAA Satellites shows the before and after images of Southern California. Notice all of the smoke from the fires moving over the ocean. The direction of the winds also highlights that these wildfires are being driven by the offshore Santa Ana winds. Forecast: On Sunday, the Storm Prediction Center is highlighting a ‘Critical’ risk for wildfires from downtown Los Angles to the US-Mexico border just east of San Diego. Relative humidities will be between 5 and 15%. The…

There are two things the forecasters at WeatherOptics are watching this week in the western US: a warm up and the risk for fires in Southern California. Warm Up: Millions of people will feel an early winter warm up across the large majority of the West this week into next week while a trough brings cold air to the East. We’re going to see a trough build into the East through this week, forcing a dip in the jet stream. What goes up must come down—that dip will lead to a rise over the West, allowing for warm air to surge into the region. It may still be on the cool side to start the week, but Wednesday will be the turning point with above-average temperatures beginning to invade most of the West. However, it’s not until the weekend and into next week when I predict highs will reach well…

A much more active week in weather is ahead for the nation overall. We have 5 things we’re watching for you this week in the weather department: Cold Blast: A blast of cold air originating from the Arctic will begin to invade portions of the country on Monday. It will reach the East Coast by the end of this week, dropping high temperatures as low as 30 degrees below average for the Eastern U.S.. View the full story on the pattern change here. Colorado Low Develops: An area of low pressure will develop over Colorado on Monday, moving northeast while strengthening. This storm will bring snow to the Northern Plains and into the Midwest while its cold front drops rain to the East. We’ll have a full, detailed look at this storm later today. Western Warmth: While a trough builds into the East this week, what goes down must come up,…