Earlier this month, our team at WeatherOptics rolled out a new website, new mobile app, and a large team of forecasters, tech savants, and entrepreneurs. We had a revised vision and direction, and a goal of making weather personalization possible nationwide, trying to disrupt what we saw as an older industry in need of innovation. Just like with any startup finding their footing, we had our fair share of issues. Launch wasn’t perfect, the app and website had some issues, and the merging of several companies into one was a difficult adjustment. The more imperative and obvious issue at hand with our “new company” however was beyond the tech and functionality, and was about what our audience (YOU!) was not satisfied with. And that was us steering away from our roots as a company.

Sometimes you experiment with things as a team and they simply don’t work, no matter how hard you try to force things together. We quickly realized, after launching our new services, that we weren’t moving in a direction that was truly in line with our vision of not only providing the most accurate and insightful weather in the industry, but also giving our users useful data and information that would help them to “better weather the storm.” At this time, we’re happy to announce that we’re moving back to the good old days of ALL FREE content on our website, and refocusing our App and Enterprise solutions to better accommodate those who need more in-depth weather solutions in a way that we hope will please everyone. What exactly does this mean?

Just as we’ve done for years, we’ll be providing articles, videos and analysis on ALL the latest weather and storms, with absolutely no charge to our audience. Free weather the way it should be.

Next we’ll be RE-LAUNCHING our WeatherOptics app over the next few days (you can delete the current one), with widgets that will provide services such as the chances of schools closing (delaying and early dismissing for every town in the country), and the chances that flights will be delayed based on the weather for every airport and location in the country. And in a few months, ADDITIONAL widgets related to the sports industry and business world (we can’t say too much about them right now) will be added to improve the app and continue to ensure we stay true to our vision of taking weather data and turning it into useful information for anyone and everyone who needs. With the help of you guys, over the next few months, we’ll continue updating and tweaking both the app and the website to continue improving our services and make sure it’s in line with what the people who made all of this possible are looking for.

With rather big changes like these, it also means changes within our company. In order for our vision of “Weather Seen Differently” and promise to keep weather accurate and useful for everyone we provide forecasts to, we have decided to part ways with Steve DiMartino and NY NJ PA Weather, as well as ROTN. We wish them the best of luck in whatever they decide to do next, but in order for us to stay in line with what we are doing, these changes are necessary.

You can expect the app to relaunch within the next week with a better version than the one (we’ll call the first a BETA) that we released a few weeks ago. On the website you’ll notice some improvements over the next few days, but starting immediately all articles, videos and content will be released for free, and analyzed with insight just as we have always done.

We cannot thank you enough for the support and for sticking with us through these various changes over the last few weeks and months, and hope you all stick around for our next chapter. We value all your feedback and will always try to listen to our audience so we can keep making our product the best it can be! We promise not to disappoint!

–  Scott Pecoriello & The WeatherOptics Team

Author

Currently leads business development and forecasting across all sectors and is the Founder and CEO. Pecoriello founded WeatherOptics in 2010 as a blog called, Wild About Weather, which quickly gained a following. He also launched an app in 2013 called, Know Snow, designed to accurately forecast the chances of school closings.

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